Where is the Holiness in the Holy Land? Gaza Under Attack

World War I, which started 100 years ago, was started because an Archduke got shot by a crazy guy in Sarajevo. The 2014 Attack on Gaza by Israel started after 3 Israeli boys were kidnapped and killed-by who it is still unclear. Even if Hamas did kidnap the boys, Hamas is not the Palestinian government, just like Gavrilo Princip wasn’t a representative of the government of Bosnia. Politically motivated murders they may have been, but they were not done on a government’s command. Yet national governments jumped in the melee, and look what ensued.

The current situation in Israel-Palestine, aka the holy land, is anything but holy. Once again, Israelites decided to borrow on the Babylonian eye-for-an-eye ideology by kidnapping and burning to death a Palestinian teen. Then the government commenced Operation Protective Edge. Neither side has acted holy towards their brothers, but-since this does not seem to be emphasized enough in the media-I would like to reiterate that Hamas is not the Palestinian government. Hamas is a terrorist organization. Israel has such a sophisticated Iron Dome defense system, and yet it is resorting to bombing civilian homes, hospitals, etc., killing entire families in the hopes of finding Hamas. Well, Hamas doesn’t really care if the Israelis keep bombing, now does it?

Last time something of this magnitude happened, back in November 2012  (it seems like yesterday!) social media, which was in full-swing, began to jump on the bandwagon with dissecting the story. This time around the chatter has only become more intense, with both positive and plenty of negative messages being volley balled from both sides. Some people have posted uplifting pictures of Jews and Arabs in solidarity, such as this inter-religious couple:

The Incredible Story Of The Arab-Jewish Couple Whose Viral Kiss Started A Peace Movement

Yet even the warmest of images cannot make one forget the utter stupidity that one finds in most posts on the World Wide Web. Apparently dating site Tinder is popular in Israel and is even used by Palestinians, something I found a bit shocking. Under Hamas influence my impression was that Palestinian society was a bit conservative, but Palestinians are using Tinder too, although likely not for ‘hooking up’ as the young crowd does here in the USA. Middle Eastern Tinder is a lot more serious, because there have been conversations like this taking place since the bombing began:

 Tinder uses geolocation to determine who is within 10 miles from you. The Israelis and Palestinians are sitting on top of each other so naturally if one uses Tinder you will get someone from the opposite side show up on your screen. The arguments that Foreign Policy.com’s blog showed are especially sad because on Tinder you can only message someone if both of you have a mutual attraction. Which either means that these two people shared a mutual attraction until they realized they were on “opposite” sides…or they wanted to start an argument in the first place.

Even though Syria, Iraq and Libya also up in flames, the conflict in the holy land is receiving the most attention (once again). It is also drawing the most public ire–and not just among Israelis and Palestinians but people across the world. Protesters in France have destroyed Jewish businesses and even interrupted a soccer game to attack a Jewish team. New Yorkers are gathering in Times Square. I even saw protest flyers on a wall in Montevideo, Uruguay! I do not agree with the general Muslim tendency to immediately erupt when Gaza gets attacked but to sit quietly by while Syria, Iraq and Libya continue to smolder–I think all four issues merit immediate and serious attention–but I am impressed with the way the rest of the world has responded to the incident. The whole world, of course, except the United States.

Displaying photo.JPG
Posters in Montevideo, Uruguay, photo taken by me.

I don’t know what it will take to make the USA realize that it is supporting a greedy, ruthless government that is violating international human rights law. Because of wealthy Jewish lobbying organizations like AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee) that tell Congress when to jump, I do not think the United States will ever waver its support. Which is weird, because I’m pretty sure if France or England did the exact same thing we’d have a hell of a lot to say to them, but whatever Israel does we just turn a blind eye to. What eye-for-an-eye game has Israel been playing with us?

 Israel and Palestine will have to exist as two separate states. There is no returning back to pre-WWII Palestine, unfortunately, but that does not mean Israel is to control Palestine for the rest of eternity. Israel as a government needs to man up and find another way to deal with Hamas besides killing innocent women and children, because Palestine is not ‘at war,’ Hamas is.The 24 July bombing of a United Nations refugee shelter, which has brought the Palestinian death toll to 788 (inwhich UN workers died) is despicable. The Holy Land needs to reclaim its holiness and embrace brotherhood and peace. Israel needs to stop fighting terrorism with terrorism and find a better way.

S-L-M

 

 

Resources

1.  http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2014/07/22/the_israeli_palestinian_conflict_as_seen_through_tinder

2. http://elitedaily.com/news/world/story-behind-photo-jewish-arab-couple-kissing/679821/

3. http://www.aipac.org/

4. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stephen-m-walt/aipac-americas-israel-policy_b_5607883.html

5. http://english.ahram.org.eg/News/107010.aspx

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